Tithing? No Problem – Test Me In This

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Church Disconnection Notice

Tithing is a pretty simple topic, right? Do it. If you’ve chosen wisely, your church will be divinely positioned to address the community’s needs and more importantly keep their doors open to continue feeding its flock.

Not quite sure to start with the letter itself or the accompanying article, but it’s pretty clear that the concept is worth discussing.

It is my understanding that the church has more than a handful of obligations to its flock… Discounting wholly the validity of the article’s angle on the church’s community involvement, I don’t see one mention of what programs these tithes would be applied to.

Nor do I see any considerable mention of why tithes are connected to active membership. I’m going to do this letter a favor and ignore the line about “overstating membership” because that’s clearly not a member problem… sounds like a tax/grant/competition/ego/whatever problem.

Plus there is a biblical mandate for us to bring our tithes and offerings to the storehouse.

Assuming that this references Malachi 3:10, I figured I would open and explore a little scripture. It’s pretty clear that our Lord is pretty adamant about not robbing his father, who wouldn’t. But he also goes onto mention how abundant the ensuing blessings would be to, and I love this part, Test me in this. I’m thinking any church with the chutzpah to send a letter like this must be doling out the community service like there’s not tomorrow.

“Bring the whole tithe into the storehouse, that there may be food in my house. Test me in this.” ~ Malachi 3:10

So to those interested in whether or not this is even a real post – it is my ardent wish that this is a hoax. I can not imagine a world, in the baby-Jesus universe we occupy, where this letter actually leaves the desk of an admin, a deacon, or a pastor. If so, they better be making it rain in a community near you.

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